Bodoland Territorial Region Agreement

Bodoland (also Boroland), officially the territorial region of Bodoland, is an autonomous region of Lower Assam, in northeastern India. It consists of four districts on the north bank of the Brahmaputra River, in the foothills of Bhutan and Arunachal Pradesh. It is managed by an elected body called the Bodoland Territorial Council, created under the conditions of a peace agreement signed in February 2003 and which strengthened its autonomy through an agreement signed in January 2020. The region covers an area of more than eight thousand square kilometers and is mainly inhabited by the Bodo and other indigenous communities of Assam. [3] [4] Along with other regions in northeastern India, regional aspirations in the region reached a turning point in the 1980s. The region`s isolation, its complex social character and its backwardness compared to other regions of the country have all led to a complex series of demands ranging from the demand for autonomy and opposition to the “outsiders” to secessionist movements. Tourism in the region is regulated by the Bodoland Tourism division. Manas National Park is the main tourist attraction of the region. It also has many wildlife reserves, reserve forests, tourist sites, picnic areas and events. [19] One of the interesting aspects of this agreement is the way in which it broadens the territorial scope of the regulation of ethnic conflicts. While the change in the nomenclature of Bodoland Territorial Districts (BTAD) in the Bodoland Territorial Region (BTR) is adapted for this purpose, the provision of Bodo-Cachari Welfare Councils outside the existing BTAD to meet the development and welfare needs of Bodos in other parts of Assam is a new institutional experiment provided for in this agreement. During the reign of King Kamata Nara Narayan, the country was inhabited by the Bodo or Mech tribe at the foot of the Bhutan hills, i.e.

the eastern and western dooars. [8] These areas were known as Kachari Duar and Mech Duar. The British took control of the area, from the Sankosh River in the west to the eastern border of colonial Assam. while the western part (Dooars) remained under British rule as Darjeeling and part of Nepal. This is how these present-day regions of Bodoland were eventually ruled by King Bara. Treaty of Yandabo after victory in the First Anglo-Burmese War in 1826. The war was primarily aimed at controlling northeastern India between the British and Burmese empires. It was then known as Kachari Dwars or Kachari Plains or Kachari country by the British during the British Raj…